Speedmail

If a lineboy tells you he’s pumping gas and hauling boxes to get his foot in the door, he’s only telling you part of the truth. The rest has to do with the sights, sounds, and smells he gets to experience on the job … alluring hints of what’s to come. Journey with Robert Bach back to Corpus Christi in 1931 for a real nice story of aviation love at first sight.

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Those Thrilling Days of Yesteryear (Episode 2): You Only Live Twice – Part Two

In Part Two of Glenn Norman’s cautionary tale of an ultralight crash, what goes up finally comes down … and it isn’t pretty. After a disorienting inverted journey back to earth (and a trip to the hospital) our hero finds himself wondering, “What now?” The surprising answer comes two days later aloft in a borrowed Cessna 150. Sometimes, he learns, it takes almost losing everything to realize what matters most.

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How It All Started

It doesn’t take much to spark a child’s imagination. François A. “Navman” Dumas has spent 50 years gazing at airplanes, reading about airplanes, building model airplanes, and learning to fly real ones. It all started rather simply, with a toy airplane milled out of steel.

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It Is Cold

A story can take a reader any where, anywhen it likes. One cold winter night Rob Bach sat down at the keyboard and typed out this story, which is guaranteed to transport you to Blakesburg, Iowa on a hot summer day. Flyins (and memories of flyins) are like that.

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Photo Essay: Birdwoman Flies!

After snagging a groundhog hole with her tailwheel, it took Michelle Goodeve five years to get her Pietenpol back in the air. Glenn Norman captured one of the flights from the ground, and crafted a stunning photo essay that captures the spirit and determination of a pilot who lives to fly.

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Am I A Pilot?

Jonathan Bach knows many pilots, yet has only eight hours of loggable time of his own. Is he a pilot? He certainly has enough time in the air to understand why his friends and family climb into the cockpit. But it’s his interactions on the ground that keep his own interest in aviation alive.

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Those Thrilling Days of Yesteryear (Episode 1): You Only Live Twice – Part One

When Glenn Norman warns “Don’t try this at home” in the preamble to this first “Those Thrilling Days of Yesteryear” story, he means it both figuratively and literally. “Many of my early flying tales were pretty irresponsible,” says Glenn. Nobody would disagree, reading many of his up-coming “episodes.” But in this case, wow … what a story!

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Photo Essay: Great Canadian Anomalies – Part 1

Last summer, Michelle Goodeve attended three aeronautical anomalies, all located in Canada’s “Golden Horseshoe” surrounding the western edge of Lake Ontario. She took A LOT of pictures. Here’s Part 1 of her photo essay on Canadian Air & Space Museum’s “Wings & Wheels Festival,” shot in and around the historic de Havilland factory at Toronto’s Downsview Airport.

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Photos: Roy McMillion

Roy McMillion’s first submissions to Why Fly convey his intention as a photographer. “I try not just to capture an image of an aircraft,” he says, “but bring the aircraft into a context that tells a story, or even better, lets the viewer create their own story.”

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Circuits – The Real Reason I Fly

With an airline pilot father and a stewardess mother, aviation is in Why Fly co-founder Hal Bryan’s blood. He grew up playing with toy airplanes and lived on an airstrip. While he can wax philosophical with the best of us, in the end, Hal flies for a reason that defies explanation at all.

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Under the B

Glenn Norman says he learned to fly because of the letter “B.” He also says he’s not superstitious. And yet, when you consider the number of places and people whose names begin with “B” that have played a pivotal role in his aviation life, you have to admit that something weird is going on.

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